• The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament

Mass Times

Saturday Vigil
4:00pmHoly Cross
5:30pmBlessed Sacrament

Sunday
8:00amHoly Cross
9:30amBlessed Sacrament
11:00amHoly Cross

Daily Mass
Mon, Wed, Fri: 8:00amHoly Cross
Tues,Thurs: 7:30amBlessed Sacrament

Reconciliation

Saturdays
Holy Cross
3:00pm to 3:45pm

Blessed Sacrament
3:15pm to 3:45pm

Outreach Services

ServicePhone
AA Helpline1-800-640-7545
Al-Anon1-800-339-9006
Birthright of Scranton570-961-1133
National Hotline For Abortion Recovery1-866-482+5433
Rachel’s Vineyard Post Abortive Healing1-877-467-3463
PA 24 Hour Child Abuse Hot Line1-800-932-0313

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TWENTY-FIFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

READINGS AND BACKGROUND

First Reading: Amos 8:4-7
Unfair business practices and injustice to the poor will be judged by God.

Responsorial Psalm: Psalm 113:1-2,4-6,7-8
Praise be to God, who raises up the poor.

Second Reading: 1 Timothy 2:1-8
Paul tells Timothy that prayer for those in authority is pleasing to God because God wills the salvation of all.

Gospel Reading: Luke 16:1-13
Jesus tells a parable about a dishonest steward who is commended for his prudence; one cannot serve both God and money.

Background on the Gospel Reading

Today’s Gospel sounds puzzling to contemporary readers, but it can be made less so by considering the economic system which stands behind the parable. A steward is dismissed because he is squandering his master’s property. He is called dishonest because he is not serving the interests of the rich man, his employer.

In response the steward, in an attempt to ensure favor for himself among the rich man’s debtors, brokers repayment of the rich man’s loans by foregoing the interest and fees that had been levied to line the steward’s pockets. It is this action in which the steward puts aside his greed and takes the longer perspective in order to enhance his security, which is commended by the rich man.

The passage concludes with three morals for the listeners. The first exhorts the listener to be prudent about the use of wealth. Like the steward in the parable, those who would follow Jesus must put transitory affairs in proper perspective. Christians should handle the affairs of temporal life with an eye toward eternal life.

The second concerns trustworthiness. Those who can be trusted in small things can also be trusted in great things. If Christians handle money and other passing things responsibly, then they can also be trusted with the affairs of the Kingdom of God.

Finally, Jesus tells his listeners that no one can serve two masters simultaneously. God must be put ahead of money.