• The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament

Mass Times

Saturday Vigil
4:00pmHoly Cross
5:30pmBlessed Sacrament

Sunday
8:00amHoly Cross
9:30amBlessed Sacrament
11:00amHoly Cross

Daily Mass
Mon, Wed, Fri: 8:00amHoly Cross
Tues,Thurs: 7:30amBlessed Sacrament

Reconciliation

Saturdays
Holy Cross
3:00pm to 3:45pm

Blessed Sacrament
3:15pm to 3:45pm

Outreach Services

ServicePhone
AA Helpline1-800-640-7545
Al-Anon1-800-339-9006
Birthright of Scranton570-961-1133
National Hotline For Abortion Recovery1-866-482+5433
Rachel’s Vineyard Post Abortive Healing1-877-467-3463
PA 24 Hour Child Abuse Hot Line1-800-932-0313

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THE BODY AND BLOOD OF THE LORD

Readings:

Mark 14: 12-16, 22-26

Exodus 24: 3-8

Hebrews 9: 11-15

Today’s celebration of the Body and Blood of the Lord originated in the Diocese of Liege in 1246 as the feast of Corpus Christi. In the reforms of Vatican II, the feast was joined with the feast of the Precious Blood (July 1) to become the Solemnity of the Body and Blood of the Lord. Today, we celebrate the Christ’s gift of the Eucharist, the source and summit of our life together as the Church.

Today’s Gospel is Mark’s account of the Last Supper. At the Passover meal marking the First Covenant, Jesus, the Lamb of the New Covenant, institutes the New Passover of the Eucharist.

The ancients believed the source of life was contained in blood – blood, therefore, belonged to God alone (that is why even today a devout Jew will never eat any meat which is not completely drained of blood). In marking Israel’s covenant with the Lord who brought them out of slavery and into freedom, Moses splashes half of the offerings’ blood on the altar, the symbol of God, and sprinkles the other half on the people, joining the covenanted people to their God (first reading).

This understanding of the sacredness of blood is central to the theme of the letter to the Hebrews (second reading). Jesus is both priest and victim on the cross, whose own blood seals a new covenant and creates a new Israel.

Themes:

Eucharist: becoming the body of Christ.

“If you have received worthily,” St. Augustine preached, “you are what you have received.” The gift of the Eucharist comes with an important “string” is attached: it must be shared. In sharing the body of Christ, we become the body of Christ. If we partake of the one bread and cup, then we must be willing to become Eucharist for others – to make the love of Christ real for all.

Eucharist: the table of the Lord.

Christ calls us to his table, offering his peace, affirmation, support and love. We come to the Eucharist to celebrate our identity as his disciples and to seek the sustaining grace to live the hard demands of such discipleship; we come to the Eucharist seeking the peace and hope of the Risen One in the compassion and support we offer and receive from one another. At Christ’s table, we are always welcome. In celebrating the Eucharist, we make our parish family’s table the Lord’s own table, a place of reconciliation and compassion.