• The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament
  • The Parishes of Holy Cross and Blessed Sacrament

Mass Times

Saturday Vigil
4:00pmHoly Cross
5:30pmBlessed Sacrament

Sunday
8:00amHoly Cross
9:30amBlessed Sacrament
11:00amHoly Cross

Daily Mass
Mon, Wed, Fri: 8:00amHoly Cross
Tues,Thurs: 7:30amBlessed Sacrament

Reconciliation

Saturdays
Holy Cross
3:00pm to 3:45pm

Blessed Sacrament
3:15pm to 3:45pm

Outreach Services

ServicePhone
AA Helpline1-800-640-7545
Al-Anon1-800-339-9006
Birthright of Scranton570-961-1133
National Hotline For Abortion Recovery1-866-482+5433
Rachel’s Vineyard Post Abortive Healing1-877-467-3463
PA 24 Hour Child Abuse Hot Line1-800-932-0313

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SOLEMNITY OF CHRIST THE KING

Readings: Matthew 25: 31-46

Ezekiel 34: 11-12, 15-17

1 Corinthians 15: 20-26, 28

Matthew’s is the only description of the Last Judgement in any of the Gospels. It is Jesus’ last discourse recorded by Matthew before the events of the Passion begin to unfold. In the vision he presents in this Gospel, Christ is the king who sits in judgement “as a shepherd separates sheep from goats.” Mercy and charity will be the standards for determining one’s entry into the future kingdom of God.

The People of Israel, exiled from their homeland and living in servitude under the Babylonians, cry out for a king to lead them. In today’s first reading, Ezekiel offers an oracle of consolation and hope: God will no longer entrust his people to evil and incompetent leaders, but will himself look after and “tend” his chosen and faithful people. The theme of personal responsibility of one’s life (a major teaching of Ezekiel) and the judgement between one “sheep” and another reflect today’s Gospel description of the Last Judgement.

Some of the Corinthians are denying the resurrection of the dead, apparently because of their inability to imagine how any king of bodily existence could be possible after death. Paul addresses this issue in chapter 15 of his first letter to the Corinthians. In the verses that make up today’s second reading, Paul praises Christ as the “first fruits” of the Resurrection – the triumphant, living Christ represents the promise that is the future of all the faithful. The Risen Christ who has vanquished death now reigns over all forever.

Themes:

The Risen Christ in the ‘disguise’ of nameless poor. Christ the Shepherd-King clearly and unequivocally identifies himself with the poor. Our “greatness” lies in our ability to reach beyond ourselves to bring justice, peace and reconciliation into the lives of everyone.

Mother Teresa of Calcutta put today’s Gospel theme so succinctly when she said: “At the end of life we will not be judged by how many diplomas we have received, how much money we have made, how many great things we have done. We will be judged by ‘I was hungry and you gave me to eat…I was naked and you clothed me…I was homeless and you took me in.’

Hungry not only for bread – but hungry for love; naked not only of clothing – but naked of human dignity and respect; homeless not only for want of a room of bricks, but homeless because of rejection. This is Christ in distressing disguise.”